Featured Story

renningers bikes blog

Find Your Antique Treasures at Renningers

You never know what you’re going to find at Renninngers Antique Market in Adamstown. The unpredictability is what keeps me coming back; there is something new every week. The maze-like antique market is home to over 600 vendors (indoor and outdoor). You’ll find typical war memorabilia, toys, bikes, maps, coins, sports memorabilia, and rugs as well as furniture and steampunk-inspired lamps.

It’s a picker’s paradise every Sunday at Renningers. The long aisles are filled with eye-catching antiques that will have you digging and exploring. If you have a specific item all the dealers are willing to direct you to where you can find it. The dealers are all very knowledgeable of their antiques as well as what others carry.

I am fascinated by antique furniture and the wide array of vintage clothes; that’s why I keep coming back. Also, the deals are great. My sister keeps coming back for the jewelry and materials to create new products (she’s a DIY fanatic). My Dad, well, he is there every Sunday to sell at his booth, Jeffrey Press Industrial, and he also purchases his items there for his original lamp creations. My brother is a history buff, so he’ll go for the military items, maps, and hardware. Finally, Mom goes for the vintage pottery (for her garden) and glassware. With a family full of makers, Renningers is our go-to place on Sundays.

12

Jeffrey Press Industrial |Summer 2015

When traveling to Renningers Antique Market, make sure to wear comfortable shoes (you’ll be walking around a lot). Another tip: bring cash! Most dealers only work with cash. Next, let your creativity flow. With the wave of DIY projects, antique and vintage materials are in high demand. Live a little and do something different with your next home project. Finally, get there early! A lot of the outdoor dealers only sell in the early morning so don’t miss out.

There are plenty of antiques and collectibles treasures each week at Renningers, so don’t just go once! Check it out a couple weekends out of the year and I am sure you will be taking antique treasures of your own home! The outdoor section is open Sunday 4:00 AM to 4:00 PM. The indoor section is open Sunday, 7:30 AM to 4:00 PM.

-
The author of this post, Julie Press, is currently the Marketing Intern at Discover Lancaster. She encompasses the Lancaster brand. Growing up in a farm house in Adamstown, she identifies with the rustic, homegrown feel Lancaster brings. Now relocated only minutes away from Lancaster City, she feels a strong connection to the City’s creativity, culture, and innovation. Julie studies Public Relations at Millersville University.

produce_blog

Green Dragon: A Famous Friday Market

Driving down Rt. 272, you can’t miss the huge retro dragon perched above a sign that directs you to the Green Dragon Farmers Market and Auction. For more than 80 years it’s been a Lancaster County tradition for locals and visitors alike to spend their Fridays looking at 400 merchants, growers, and craftsmen on the 30 acre property.

Green Dragon has seven large market buildings, unique cottages, and outdoor vender tents. It offers both indoor and outdoor shopping experiences and a wide variety of products. From country cooking and produce to crystals and clothing, Green Dragon offers something for everyone. If you need a neat place to take your kids or if you’re hanging out with your friends and want to grab a bite to eat, check out Green Dragon.

What I like about Green Dragon is the diversity of products; it truly captures the essence of Lancaster. While inside, I enjoy walking around, watching people, and devouring a delicious sausage sandwich. Outside, my favorite cottages include: Hallelujah Hive (best honey you will ever try), India Moon Boutique (bohemian clothes and gemstone jewelry), All about Jerky (exotic jerkies from all different animals), and Cocalico Creek Country store (rustic chic).

Enjoy the spring and summer weather, plus get your exercise by walking through this unique place – all while soaking in the Lancaster County culture. You’ll discover something new each time you go!

Green Dragon is open from 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM every Friday.

-

The author of this post, Julie Press, is currently the Marketing Intern at Discover Lancaster. She encompasses the Lancaster brand. Growing up in a farm house in Adamstown, she identifies with the rustic, homegrown feel Lancaster brings. Now relocated only minutes away from Lancaster City, she feels a strong connection to the City’s creativity, culture, and innovation. Julie studies Public Relations at Millersville University.

centralmarket

Downtown Lancaster Tips

Lancaster City is unique – you have to visit in order to understand. It’s exciting, it’s rich in history, heritage and the arts, and there’s an underlying hip urban vibe that permeates the community. The City boasts art in every form, restaurants and cafes, and boutique shops and hotels. Creativity, inspiration, and community envelopes this walkable City.

Come spend a day (or two) exploring. Below are a few insider tips that I believe will help you get the most out of your trip.

Tip #1 – Walk, don’t drive

Plan to walk around the City. Take your time and drink it all in. You won’t want to miss anything. From historic ghost signs to an off-the-beaten-path puppet theatre, this place has it all.

Tip #2 – Find a parking garage

Downtown Lancaster has many easily-locatable and easily-accessible garages. Although you may find street parking, chances are you’ll spend less money at a parking garage.

Tip #3 – Check gallery hours

If you like original art, check out Gallery Row located on the first and second blocks of Prince Street where you will find over 20 galleries. My tip – go online and check out gallery hours first. Not all galleries have the same hours.

Tip #4 – Take a back stage tour

Further down Prince Street, you’ll find what I like to call the “performing arts triangle.” To one side is The Trust performing arts center and directly across the street is The Ware Center; both are owned and operated by local colleges. Within a stone’s throw of these performance spaces is the majestic and historic Fulton Theatre.

These venues allow visitors to tour the facility even if you are not going to see a performance. The Fulton Theatre offers their backstage tour every Friday at Noon (the history is unique and the building is haunted). The Ware Center offers self-guided tours from 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM Monday through Friday and from 10:00 AM to 2:30 PM on Saturday (this building’s architecture is amazing). The Trust Performing Arts Center hosts tours 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM on Tuesdays and Fridays and from 9:00 AM to 2:00 PM on Saturdays (this building used to be one of Lancaster’s largest banks; ask to see the vault).

Tip #5 – Eat here; shop there

I suggest checking out the menus at Aussie and The Fox and at the Pressroom Restaurant (this place has a great outdoor seating area). Don’t miss Lancaster Central Market, America’s old continually operating farmer’s market, but note the hours: Tuesdays and Fridays from 6:00 AM to 4:00 PM and Saturdays from 6:00 AM to 2:00 PM.

After grabbing a bite to eat, check out the 300 block of Queen Street where you’ll find great shopping and a quaint café – Commonwealth on Queen – that sells gourmet coffee and sweet treats from scratch. Be sure to stop at Mommalicious and Building Character.

MV Formal Gardens

Enjoying and Protecting the Valuable Resources of Lancaster County

Lancaster County’s green pastures and cattle-dotted hillsides add to the peaceful experience of visitors from large cities and crowded suburbs. It was this fertile land, the natural
resources, and idyllic scenery that attracted the founders of the Masonic Village to its 1,400-acre location in Elizabethtown more than 100 years ago.

People have moved from 31 states to the Masonic Village at Elizabethtown, a continuing care retirement community. Two of the reasons cited are an appreciation for the grazing beef cattle and the on-site orchard and Farm Market.

The Masonic Village Farm Market sells apples, peaches, nectarines, sweet cherries, tart
cherries, plums, and pears from its orchard, as well as canned and baked goods, premium dry-aged beef, and other items. In the fall, it offers pick-your-own apple and pumpkin dates.

Masonic Village residents and the local community also frequent the Orchard View Café. The café serves hand-dipped ice cream, milk shakes, sundaes, soda floats, hot dogs, hot soup, apple cider slushies, and weekly specials.

In addition to the orchard and Farm Market, this valuable land enables Masonic Village
visitors approximately eight miles of scenic walking paths to traverse, a Veterans Grove and Eternal Flame monument to reflect upon and Formal Gardens which serve as a backdrop for high school proms, family photos, and weddings (please check with our event planning department before scheduling a photo shoot).

“Land is the only true resource there is,” Frank Stoltzfus, supervisor of agricultural
production for farm operations at Masonic Village, said. “Everything we have comes from the earth in one way or another: food, clothing, shelter, energy, etc. We cannot make any more land, so it is imperative that we take care of every acre we are entrusted with.”

The farms and pastoral country sides of Lancaster County symbolize the hard work
of generations of caretakers of the land. The fruits of their labors are just one of many
reasons people love to visit, work and live in the county. Come experience it for yourself!

Photography by Alysha Laird

Scientific and Spectacular

The newly renovated North Museum of Nature and Science is a fascinating place for all ages. In my early 20′s, I was learning, having fun, and genuinely interested in the exhibits and collections. This space holds a new SciDome Theater, Nature Explorer Gallery, Nanotechnology exhibit, mineral collection and mid-Atlantic region bird collection.

Photography by Alysha Laird

Photography by Alysha Laird

As you walk into the North Museum, you are welcomed by their baby t-Rex and a massive globe displaying active weather patterns. To the right of the globe, you enter SciDome Theater, a touch digital system that projects high definition video and images onto a 41-foot aluminum dome. SciDome could be compared to a planetarium, but one difference is the type of shows. This theater expanded its programming to earth science shows to give guests a new experience on topics they would never have seen in a planetarium. Right now, SciDome is showing One World, One Sky: Big Bird’s Adventure, Super Volcanoes, and Magic Treehouse: Space Mission. The imagery in SciDome is astonishing; shows give real life perspectives in a movie-like experience. On June 20, SciDome will be presenting shows daily!

Photography by Alysha Laird

Photography by Alysha Laird

Past SciDome Theater, you enter the Nature Explorer Gallery, a combination of former Discovery Room and Live Animal Room. This gallery is filled with displays of unique shells, rocks, insects, and fossils. Children can examine different objects in nature like horns, furs, and space in the hands-on section of this gallery.

The most unique portion of this gallery is a tie between the bird call drum kit and the functioning beehive. The bird call drum kit collaborates creativity with nature. You might find your child has a hidden musical talent with this interactive piece! If you’re not a beekeeper, you don’t find yourself getting too close to beehives. With the functioning beehive display, you are able to examine how the bees interact and watch how they sustain the hive! To the left of the Nature Explorer Gallery, the Live Animal Room is occupied with unique reptiles, arachnids, and amphibians and with the help of the staff you can interact with these animals and learn more about them.

The nanotechnology exhibit is a small portion of the first floor but it is fascinating! This exhibit highlights the application of nanotechnology in our everyday life in basic terms. Past the nanotechnology exhibit is the featured Dinosaur Discoveries: Ancient Fossils, New Ideas. This exhibit is organized by American Museum of Natural History in collaboration with California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, The Field Museum, Chicago, Houston Museum of Natural History, and North Carolina Museum of Natural Science. This exhibit will be on display until June 21.

The antique cabinet museum, displayed on the bottom floor, holds a large collection of male and female birds native to the Mid-Atlantic region. Past the aisles of cabinets is one of the largest mineral collections I have ever seen.

Photography by Alysha Laird

Photography by Alysha Laird

After this experience, I realized the North Museum holds innovative and cutting-edge technology and exhibits. From SciDome Theater to the bird call drum kit, live animal room, and the nanotechnology exhibit I was truly impressed. This museum would be great for a day trip with your kids. After the museum, kids can play in Buchanan Park.

The North Museum summer hours are listed below.

June 1 – August 31
Monday – Saturday:
10 am to 5 pm
Sunday:
12 noon to 5 pm
-
The author of this post, Julie Press, is currently the Marketing Intern at Discover Lancaster. She encompasses the Lancaster brand. Growing up in a farm house in Adamstown, she identifies with the rustic, homegrown feel Lancaster brings. Now relocated only minutes away from Lancaster City, she feels a strong connection to the City’s creativity, culture, and innovation. Julie studies Public Relations at Millersville University.

 

The author of this post, Julie Press, is currently the Marketing Intern at Discover Lancaster. She encompasses the Lancaster brand. Growing up in a farm house in Adamstown, she identifies with the rustic, homegrown feel Lancaster brings. Now relocated only minutes away from Lancaster City, she feels a strong connection to the City’s creativity, culture, and innovation. Julie studies Public Relations at Millersville University. – See more at: http://padutchcountryblog.com/#sthash.E0rTYOAa.dpuf
The author of this post, Julie Press, is currently the Marketing Intern at Discover Lancaster. She encompasses the Lancaster brand. Growing up in a farm house in Adamstown, she identifies with the rustic, homegrown feel Lancaster brings. Now relocated only minutes away from Lancaster City, she feels a strong connection to the City’s creativity, culture, and innovation. Julie studies Public Relations at Millersville University. – See more at: http://padutchcountryblog.com/#sthash.E0rTYOAa.dpu
blog-template

Outdoor Dining Experiences in Lancaster

The chatter, laughter, and warmth fills outdoor dining areas in Lancaster during this time of year. From local foods, live music, and tasty treats, everything seems to be more enjoyable outside. In this post, we’ll tell you about unique outdoor dining options for a night out with your friends, a romantic evening with your significant other, or a joyful time with your family.

Are you and your friends looking for a place to “chill” and enjoy some craft brews outside? Look no further than Lancaster Brewing Company. With an outdoor patio and a wide variety of beers, it’s a perfect place to quench your thirst and kick back. While you’re there enjoy some delicious food like the homemade artisan sausage dish.

If your friends are into roof spaces, check out Tellus360′s roof bar equipped with a plenty of seating and beautiful views. Tellus360 teamed up with local, 100% natural juice business, Rijuice, to create a line of signature cocktails. Take a look at the green roof grill menu, order a drink, and  enjoy the sunset!

Now, if you and your friends are into history and home brews you got to check out Bube’s Brewery in Mt. Joy. The Biergarten, the outdoor dining area, is one of the many remarkable spaces within Bube’s Brewery. This space is loaded with neat things, like a human-sized chess board, original boiler and smokestack used to create the steam power necessary to run the brewery.

For a couple’s night out, relax in Steinman Park, The Pressroom’s outdoor dining area. You’ll find  an oasis complete with a waterfall and plenty of shade. Enjoy their zing on American cuisine; we promise, it will be time well spent.

For an cosmopolitan eatery on Gallery Row visit Pour for fresh seasonal flavors, wine, beer and cocktails. Share one of their famous charcuterie boards in warm and artistic ambiance.

blog-templateFamily-friendly outdoor dining includes Loxley’s, a premier outdoor dining experience. On the grounds of the restaurant lies an extravagant tree house for the kids to explore, delicious flatbread pizzas, and absolute fun!page-loxleys

If you’re looking for more a meal in the country, check out Bird-in-Hand Bakery and Cafe. They recently opened a second story patio for their guests that overlooks Lancaster farmland.

There is no lack of outdoor dining experience here in Lancaster. From local favorites to “I never knew this was here,” these outdoor spaces add versatility and excitement any dining experience. Discover it on your own!


The author of this post, Julie Press, is currently the Marketing Intern at Discover Lancaster. She encompasses the Lancaster brand. Growing up in a farm house in Adamstown, she identifies with the rustic, homegrown feel Lancaster brings. Now relocated only minutes away from Lancaster City, she feels a strong connection to the City’s creativity, culture, and innovation. Julie studies Public Relations at Millersville University.

minihorsefarm

An authentic Amish experience

For an authentic Amish experience that’s guaranteed to put a smile on the faces of the entire family, be sure to visit the Lil’ Country Store and Miniature Horse Farm. There’s nothing cuter than a miniature horse and even cuter yet is that right now (as I’m writing this in May) three of the tiny horses have newborn babies; with two more foals on the way! These creatures are friendly as they are adorable and as we walked through the barn, they poked their sweet noses through their stall doors to say hello. I couldn’t help but smile as my 1 ½ year old son squealed with delight as one foal nuzzled his hand.

The barn houses about 8 mini horses (not counting the foals), two full size horses, and in the nearby pasture are some playful goats. You can browse the barn on your own and spend time interacting with the horses, as well as seeing the pony carts, two Amish buggies, and the tack used to saddle and bridle the horses for riding. For young horse enthusiasts, a private pony ride is only $5.50 per child! And for a more hands-on experience, you can call ahead to reserve a private workshop session where you get brush a pony, ride them, feed them, and learn about horse care. The workshops generally last about an hour, and (parents beware!) are sure to be so fun that they’ll inspire your child to add a pony to their Christmas list. You can also elect to try a ride in the single or double pony cart which takes you on a ride through the farm to the dairy area. You’ll be happy to know that for safety reasons, no pony cart rides venture onto the main roads. Also, please note, the weight limit for riding these little guys is approximately 70lbs. There’s no age limit, but for my son, I decided to wait until next year to let him ride, since as a rambunctious little boy his idea of fun would probably be to dive off the poor unsuspecting horse into the mud! Oy-vay!

The best thing about this particular location is that it’s located at the home of Henry and Linda Stoltzfus, an Amish family who opened their property to the public in 2009. It’s “as real as it gets” here in Lancaster County. To get to the farm, you drive through rolling acres of corn and tobacco crops, and as we pulled our car in to the driveway, we were greeted by three Amish children who were playing in the front yard of the home. The Lil’ Country Store is in the garage of the property, and features handmade gifts and crafts, as well as a variety of baked goods and a fan-favorite,he home-made root beer. You can enjoy taste-testing locally made cheeses and potato chips, or satisfy your sweet tooth with a whoopie pie or locally made ice cream. There’s also a wood shop on the property, and you can observe the men working as they create beautiful hand made furniture and accessories that are available for sale in the shop.

Before leaving I couldn’t resist purchasing a lovely equestrian-inspired leather bracelet, which will always remind me of our fun visit to the miniature horse farm. So whether you’re visiting with children, or just want to feel like you’ve been behind the scenes on a real Amish Farm, be sure to add this destination to your vacation plans!

aqs2015

Spring means AQS Quiltweek®

After such a cold and snowy winter, spring has finally arrived. The dreariness of winter made my trip to Lancaster for the AQS Quiltweek® event in March even more exciting this year. Even though the weather was still cold and gray, the Lancaster County Convention Center was blooming with warmth and color like a magical spring day.

It’s my tradition to stop at Lancaster Central Market before the event to grab a chocolate whoopie pie and a cup of coffee. I didn’t break with tradition. I enjoyed the moist cookie and creamy filling as I waited in line for the event. [NOTE: They do not allow food or drinks in the exhibition or sales areas, so be sure to finish your whoopie before you go in!]

For the second year in a row, Katherine Rupp, the Marketing Director of the American Quilter’s Society, gave me a tour of the exhibits and pointed out some local winners in the quilt contests. Pennsylvania is always well represented in the winner’s circle. It’s exciting to see my fellow local quilters do so well in the competitions.

One of my favorite quilts this year was by Sue Reno of Columbia titled “Jack in the Pulpit.” The quilt reminded me of spring when all the woodland plants come out of hiding. My favorite exhibit was Cherrywood’s “WICKED,” based on the book and Broadway show, Wicked. It showcased small quilts made with their signature green colored hand-dyed fabrics.  Seeing the collection hung together was striking.

If you are not a quilter yourself, you still have plenty of reasons to visit a Quiltweek® event. Quilts are pieces of art and represent hand-craftsmanship at its finest. Like a fabric art gallery, a quilt event like this showcases the traditional bed quilt next to the modern art quilt and allows the viewer to think for themselves what the world “quilt” really means.

Not only are the quilts varied and exciting, the vendors have lots to offer as well. From jewelry and beauty items to household tools and the most up-to-date sewing machinery, there are sorts of things to try out, try on, and take home with you.

If you are a quilter or someone who loves working with fabric and thread in any fashion, you definitely will want to spend an entire day getting inspiration and ideas from these wonderful artisans. The supply of fabrics and threads is endless. Stocking up is always a good idea because with this special show comes special sales prices.

Every year I leave Quiltweek® with a renewed zest for my fabric stash and vow I’ll make more quilts than ever. I hope you visit AQS Quiltweek® next year and enjoy all it has to offer!

Amish children

Amish Nicknames

Some visitors unfamiliar with the Amish see their conservative dress and lifestyle and, for some reason, think the Amish are a serious, austere group of people who rarely smile or laugh. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Our Amish friends love to laugh and joke, and their sense of humor is especially exhibited in… nicknames.

One category of nicknames derives from physical or personality traits. Examples are Big Ben, Brownie Eli, Black Sam, Chubby Jonas, Skinny Davie, Porky Dan, Shorty Abner, Toey Steve, and Limpy John. The color of their hair or beard gave the names to Red Elmer, Pinky Eli, Sandy Crist, and Whitey Manuel. I especially like “See More Sam,” whose eyes were set wide apart.

Perhaps more interesting are names based on personality. “Balky John” was stubborn; “Boom Daniel” liked to bellow loudly; “Lummicks Amos” was clumsy; “Coonie Jonathan” liked to hunt; and “Doggie Aaron” loved dogs. An Amish friend informed me that “Coonie’s son married Doggie’s daughter.”

Another set of nicknames comes from funny or memorable incidents associated with a person. “Gravy Dan” earned his nickname because “at a threshing dinner he once poured gravy instead of cream in his coffee.” Another Amishman received the name “Stover” because he once moved a stove from one farm to another, and charged for the service at both ends! “Slinky” got his name from when he played baseball in the schoolyard and scrunched himself down like a slinky when he was at bat. And then there is “Pepper Yonnie,” who got his name when he put some pepper on the heat stove after a hymnsing, and made people sneeze. He apparently cleared the room!

Occupation often figures into a nickname. ”Butter Jake” made and sold butter, “Elevator Ike” invented a farm elevator, “Crusher John” worked in a stone quarry, “Jockey Joe” traded horses, and “Lawyer John” seemed to have skills in legal matters, even though he was not a lawyer.

Then there was “Chicken Elam,” who owned a chicken farm, and “Chickie Dan,” who worked for him. “Cherry John” used to sell cherries, but was known as “Butcher John” when he had that occupation. “Junkie Jake” likes to buy and sell antiques and collectibles. And of course, “Horseradish Sam” gets his name from selling ground horseradish in jars.

The newest name I learned about had to do with an Amishman who milks Dutch Belt cows, which are black cows with a white “belt” running down their middle. Because these cows are black with white in the middle, the farmer has gotten the name of (what else?)… “Oreo Alvin.”

wolf_sanctuary

Lancaster’s Wolf Sanctuary

There are three sounds I’ve heard in my life that I will never forget: the sound of my mom singing “Day is Done” (don’t ask); the sound of pebbles washing back into the waves on the beach in Riomaggiore, Italy; and the sound of 45 wolves howling at once.

These 45 wolves live a mere 15 miles away from my house, at the Wolf Sanctuary in Speedwell Forge. The sanctuary is a non-profit organization that maintains a natural environment for rescued wolves and wolf-hybrids, educating visitors about wolf culture and the plight of these species – many of which are extinct or endangered.

The day that I visited the sanctuary was muddy. I changed into the boots that I keep in the trunk of my car (doesn’t everyone?). Shortly after, a busload of boys aged 13-16 showed up as part of a school field trip. Now, I have two younger brothers, and I remember ages 13-16. Not pretty! As I walked around for an hour that day, I not only observed the wolves, learning about their histories, personalities, and behaviors. I also observed the students, fascinated by their fascination, respect, and interest in learning about these regal creatures.

If a wolf sanctuary can keep 20+ teen/preteen boys interested, I’m willing to bet almost everyone will love the experience. The sanctuary is volunteer-run and open year-round, offering public tours on Saturdays, Sundays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays (visit their website for registration details). They also run special events, including full moon tours which draws hundreds of people and includes a bonfire and fundraisers like the upcoming Music and Art with the Wolves (May 9, 11am-3pm). If you go, here is my advice:

  • Wear comfortable shoes that you don’t mind getting muddy.
  • Go in the winter if possible. The wolves are more active and their coats are full when it’s cold.
  • Bring a camera.
  • Bring all of your friends.

And lastly, ask your tour guide to try to get the wolves to howl together. This is how they communicate with each other within and between packs. To be honest I have never heard a more haunting and beautiful sound.

About the author: Erin moved to Lancaster from upstate New York. She enjoys exploring Lancaster’s flourishing arts and literary scenes. Learn more about Erin at erindorney.com or follower her on Twitter at @edorney.

- See more at: http://padutchcountryblog.com/author/erin-dorney/#sthash.riOtnumN.dpuf

Current Stories

chiques rock

A Day of River Therapy

Getting out of the kayak during the trip is not only acceptable, it’s encouraged. We pulled up on an exposed stretch of pebbles, then waded out to... Read more

waltz

Waltzing through the Vineyards

Whether you have a well-developed pallet with refined taste or you are just beginning to explore the wonders of estate wines, you will love the Waltz... Read more

amishfarmhouse

Amish Farm and House

This destination is great for all ages, and features all aspects of Amish life, including guided tours through a staged Amish home, school house,... Read more

Sign up for our Email Newsletter

Get event invitations, exclusive contests, deals, coupons, and trip ideas - right to your inbox, every month.

Sign Up

Order your free 2014 Getaway Guide!

The 2014 Getaway Guide is packed with information on where to stay, where to eat, where to have fun, where to shop — you name it!

Order Now